Chapter XXII - Local Authorities, National Mechanisms & Decision-Making

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   This document has been made available in electronic format
      by the International Co-operative Alliance ICA
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  Contribution of Co-operative Enterprises and the International
     Co-operative Movement to Implementation of UN AGENDA 21:
       Programme of Action for Sustainable Development 
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                     Prepared jointly by
             the International Co-operative Alliance
                              and 
                      the United Nations
  Department for Policy Coordination and Sustainable Development

                 Geneva and New York, April 1995


        For information purposes only. Not an official
   document of the United Nations and not officially edited.

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                       CHAPTER XXII
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XXII.  LOCAL AUTHORITIES' INITIATIVES IN SUPPORT OF AGENDA 21
       (CHAPTER 28), NATIONAL MECHANISMS (CHAPTER 37) AND
       INTEGRATING ENVIRONMENTAL AND DEVELOPMENT IN DECISION-  
       MAKING (CHAPTER 8)

    As an expression of one of the fundamental principles of the
co-operative movement - that of community, whereby co-operatives
are concerned about the communities in which they exist - co-
operative enterprises and business groupings in many countries
have begun to enter into informal and formal partnerships with
local government authorities. In a number of countries this has
involved the transformation into co-operative enterprises of
economic and social activities formerly undertaken by public
agencies: particularly in the areas of utilities, infrastructure,
housing, health and social services.  Here and elsewhere
community development co-operatives work closely with local
government authorities.

   Given the interest of the co-operative movement and local
governments in sustainable development, and notably the
subsidiarity aspects of such development, it can be expected that
environmental issues are becoming of increasing significance
within this shift to closer relationships and formal
partnerships.   However, at the time of writing no concrete
examples were known.

   At the national level in many countries there is a close
relationship between the co-operative movement and governments,
expressed in both sectoral and general areas of policy
formulation and implementation. Again, however, concrete examples
of collaboration for sustainable development are not known -
although this should not be taken to indicate that they do not
exist, or will not appear increasingly in the future.